How to mix potting soil for indoor plants



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Indoor plants need a good quality soil that offers both water retention and aeration for them to grow and thrive. So what is the best soil for indoor plants? Related article: Top 20 hard to kill indoor plants Related article: Top 10 trending indoor plants and where to use them. All plants prefer different conditions, such as the amount of sun, frequency of watering, and type of soil! Most of the time though, I find this potting mix formula keeps my indoor plants — everything from succulents to ferns — happy and thriving.

Content:
  • How to Repot Your Indoor Plants
  • Houseplants 101: Substrate
  • Best Potting Soil - The Dirt on Dirt
  • How to Choose the Right Potting Mix for Your New Houseplant!
  • Homemade Potting Media
  • The Best Potting Soil for Indoor Plants – 2021 Reviews
WATCH RELATED VIDEO: Potting and Indoor Plant - ZZ Plant, Pothos u0026 Potting Soil Tips!

How to Repot Your Indoor Plants

Before repotting, bathe smooth-leaved house plants in tepid water to help remove dirt or dust. It is midwinter. You are occasionally stuck indoors, but your fingers are itching to play in the dirt. Why not channel that frustrated gardening energy into repotting some of your indoor house plants? As most houseplants appreciate being bumped up into a larger pot every couple of years, this activity could be beneficial for both you and your green cohabitants. Notice the circling roots and air pockets in the old potting soil or this pot-bound house plant.

First, check if the houseplant you have in mind for an overhaul is actually pot bound. The most obvious warning sign that it is time to repot is that your plant dries out quickly between watering, even in wintertime when house plants are generally resting. Then, ask yourself if water runs straight through the pot and out the bottom when you water it.

Or, is there a noticeable gap between the inside rim of the pot and the soil? Are the roots matted? Do roots circle around the outside edge of the potting medium?

Are there visible air pockets in the potting medium? Are any roots growing through the drainage hole of your container? Again, if you found some of these markers, you know for certain that you need to repot this plant. Water your plant in its original container, then allow it to rest for about an hour to reduce stress during transplanting. This waiting period is perfect for hunting for a larger container, thoroughly washing the container you are going to use, and cleaning up the plant.

Instead, take a pair of scissors or sharp pruners to trim off any dead material. You can also trim off the dried brown tips of leaves if you think that this makes the plant look better. Next, wash dust off smooth-leaved foliage houseplants. These plants can be taken into a sink or shower and rinsed directly with tepid water.

Make sure that you also get the undersides of the leaves. If you need to clean your plant in place, just gently wipe each leaf from the trunk or leaf base toward the tip with a damp cloth. I still like to use the old-fashioned recipe of 1 part milk to 2 parts warm water to wash smooth foliage, and this treatment will leave a slight shine behind.

For fuzzy-leaved plants, like African Violets, clean them by misting their leaves with tepid water, then keep them out of any direct sunlight until after they are completely dry. Spider mites are notorious for hiding on their almost transparent webs in the foliage of houseplants as these minuscule mites thrive in the low humidity of our nicely heated homes. If you spot an insect problem, treat it before you return the plant to its place. Now, it is time to repot.

Open any bag of Black Gold potting medium. You will immediately notice that the soilless potting medium is light and friable, and combines several key ingredients. Perlite, which is a lightweight, expanded volcanic rock, is used to improve both drainage and aeration. The specialty mixes often contain vermiculite, a naturally occurring mineral that is highly absorbent, lightweight, and a common addition to soilless growing mixes as it has a high water-holding capacity and neutral pH to promote faster, healthier root growth.

Black Gold also utilizes organic material close to the source, so you will note that its compost components change depending on what part of the country the product was manufactured. Tip your houseplant out of its original container, then using your fingers, tenderly tease circling roots loose and remove most of the old potting medium from the exposed root ball.

Place a small amount of your new potting medium in the bottom of the new, clean container. Do not place rocks, broken pieces of older pots, or Styrofoam pellets in the bottom of a pot, as this only reduces the amount of potting soil that your plant needs to remain healthy. Place your plant into its new pot, and begin filling in around the sides with potting medium, making sure that you work the soil into all of the empty spaces and firm it around the edges.

It may be tempting to top dress your container, but it is better to leave the original soil line of the plant exposed. Water the newly transplanted houseplant, again, and fill in any depressions you may see with more potting medium. Allow the plant to rest and drain before placing it back where it is usually situated.

You just spent some quality gardening time nurturing your indoor plants. This may help tide you over until you can go back outside. This site may contain content including images and articles as well as advice, opinions and statements presented by third parties. Sun Gro does not review these materials for accuracy or reliability and does not endorse the advice, opinions, or statements that may be contained in them. Sun Gro also does not review the materials to determine if they infringe the copyright or other rights of others.

Reliance upon any such opinion, advice, statement or other information is at your own risk. While we have made every effort to ensure the information on this website is reliable, Sun Gro Horticulture is not responsible for any errors or omissions, or for the results obtained from the use of this information. Use of this site is subject to express terms of use. By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use. Repotting Houseplants January 19, am By: Pam Beck Before repotting, bathe smooth-leaved house plants in tepid water to help remove dirt or dust.

Friable, organic, soilless potting medium is perfect for house plants. The label lets you know the ingredients are good. A very happily repotted rubber tree sitting next to my desk, again. About Pam Beck Pam Beck began her gardening education in by volunteering in a public herb garden, which inspired her to join the Master Gardeners and take horticulture classes.

She has worked in garden center retail, learned plant production hands-on in a nursery, created designs for landscape contractors and homeowners, and was an assistant with Cooperative Extension for a short time.

Currently, her busy speaking schedule takes her throughout the Southeast enthusiastically sharing her love of plants, gardens of all kinds, and the people who tend them. Sells Online. Great Gardening Articles!


Houseplants 101: Substrate

Houseplants are normally grown in a nutrient containing " growing media " or " growing medium " which can be compost or soil , although it's often a peat or peat-free mix. You can normally use these products straight from the bag and get great results, so why write an extensive article about the topic? Well a lot of indoor gardeners like to have some control over the "mixes" that they use, especially because not all houseplants like the same thing. Others take enjoyment from creating their own "blends" from scratch so want to learn about what they can use or you may just want to get to grips with the difference between Perlite and Vermiculite.

potting soil mix. If you drive past our house during any growing season, you will most likely see plants in pots. We have a few reasons for this.

Best Potting Soil - The Dirt on Dirt

Just like gardening outdoors, soil plays a vital role in the survival and growth of your houseplant. The potting soil or media in which a plant grows must be of good quality. It should be porous for root aeration and drainage but also capable of water and nutrient retention. Plant roots must have air, food and water and potting soil must be porous enough to allow drainage of excess water and to admit oxygen soil aeration needed by the roots. Garden soil may appear ideal for potting indoor plants but actually causes problems. This soil may be wonderful for outdoor gardening under natural conditions, but after a few months garden soil becomes hard and almost rock-like in a plant pot. Plants in garden soil grow satisfactorily for a month or two, but soon the lower leaves turn yellow and the plants become unthrifty. This problem is the result of poor drainage and the lack of soil aeration due to improper soil structure. Most garden soils become compacted with time and house plants grow poorly in compacted soil. A proper soil mixture is of utmost importance to a house plant because the roots are restricted by the pot.

How to Choose the Right Potting Mix for Your New Houseplant!

Finding the perfect houseplant potting mix can be frustrating. In this post, I am going to show you exactly how to make potting soil for indoor plants, from scratch. This mix only has three ingredients, and is perfect to use for growing houseplants. However, if you have succulents or cactus plants, they require a special medium. So, you should use this recipe instead.

Indoor plants are sweeping the nation.

Homemade Potting Media

Large bag soils 1 cubic ft or more are only available to retail stores in the eastern half of the United States. You may be able to purchase them by using the online option when clicking Where to Buy above. Everything you need to know to grow happy, healthy, perfect houseplants. Click here to view our e-Book. For use on:. When to use:.

The Best Potting Soil for Indoor Plants – 2021 Reviews

Before repotting, bathe smooth-leaved house plants in tepid water to help remove dirt or dust. It is midwinter. You are occasionally stuck indoors, but your fingers are itching to play in the dirt. Why not channel that frustrated gardening energy into repotting some of your indoor house plants? As most houseplants appreciate being bumped up into a larger pot every couple of years, this activity could be beneficial for both you and your green cohabitants. Notice the circling roots and air pockets in the old potting soil or this pot-bound house plant. First, check if the houseplant you have in mind for an overhaul is actually pot bound. The most obvious warning sign that it is time to repot is that your plant dries out quickly between watering, even in wintertime when house plants are generally resting.

Click here to view our new store, including everything from indoor potting mixes to moss pole hooks. Please support our small business! 'Houseplant Potting Mix'.

There are the dozens of succulents I thought would thrive on my kitchen windowsill, only to wilt, brown and crumple into a heap of dust a few weeks later. Then there are the two beautiful palms that I impulse-bought online from The Home Depot and had delivered right to my doorstep the next afternoon. They stood in all of their beautiful, leafy glory for approximately 2.

RELATED VIDEO: How I Mix My Own Potting Soil For Houseplants - chunky + well draining, answering your FAQ

Click here to view our new store, including everything from indoor potting mixes to moss pole hooks. Please support our small business! It's a well-known fact that a healthy plant grows in the appropriate potting mix. A soil-profile that's too water-retentive will strip the roots of oxygen, causing them to respire and slowly breakdown anaerobically.

The vast majority of plants need soil in order to live. Whilst premium general purpose mix is good on its own, it can be useful to add soil amendments such as perlite or coir to improve drainage.

What is potting soil—and do you have to buy it? The answer is no! Boost your gardening how-to and save money by creating your own homemade potting soil. Whether you use it with houseplants indoors, or for window boxes outside, potting soil is an essential element in any garden container. That's because potting soil is different than gardening soil: It is lighter and airier, so it helps to keep water moving from top to bottom and keep plant roots as healthy as possible. Garden soil, on the other hand, moves water to the bottom and holds it there.

Potting a new plant is as simple as going to Home Depot for a plant, a pot, and a bag of all-purpose potting mix, right? Plants have different needs, including different requirements for water, light, and temperature, and they have different soil preferences as well. Soil mix is crucial because when your plant lives in a pot, that pot is their ecosystem.



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